Cupping Therapy

Detail of an acupuncture therapist removing a glass globe in a fire cupping procedure

This therapy, like massage, creates space and separation in the tissues that allows the therapist to work more effectively and comfortably on the client.

  • Cupping Therapy is a specific set of movements that the trained practitioner uses in different combinations to quickly facilitate elimination of debris and release of rigid soft tissues.
  • The movements and techniques stay within the boundaries of professional licensing and may be adapted to almost any modality that the therapist has training in.

Massage Cupping Therapy is a more commonly used tool for massage therapists and other healthcare practitioners. The movements are specific to bodywork and stay within the boundaries of professional licensing. Before applying the cup, the therapist will administer oil or lotion to facilitate smooth movement, since the cup is kept active and is not left stationary on the client’s body. The entire back may be treated, including the neck, shoulders, middle and lower back, and sacral area. The hip and thigh areas may also be treated, and abdominal Massage Cupping bodywork feels just incredible. Almost every area of the body responds to this unique treatment.

Purpose of Cupping: To promote health and healing by loosening soft tissue and connective tissue, scarring and adhesions, moving stagnation and increasing lymphatic flow and circulation.

Conditions that Respond well to Cupping include:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Bursitis, Tendonitis and other inflammatory conditions
  • Sluggish colon, IBS
  • Stagnant lymph and edema
  • Poor circulation
  • Sciatica
  • Insomnia and anxiety
  • Poorly nourished skin and muscle tissue
  • Lung inflammation and congestion
  • Cellulite
  • Toxicity
  • Migraine and headaches
  • High blood pressure
  • Asthma and pneumonia
  • Neuralgia and rheumatism
  • Pre- and post-operative conditions
  • TMJ dysfunction
  • Diabetes
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Chronic pain
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Athletic stress and injury

Physiological Effects:

  • Decrease or relieve pain and inflammation
  • Release deep muscular issues
  • Release and soften scar tissue
  • Lift and stretch soft tissue
  • Increased range of movement
  • Open chest and lungs
  • Improve circulation
  • Drain lymph fluid, clear drainage pathways
  • Sedate the nervous system
  • Open energy flow of the body
  • Dredging and clearing old residue (blood and solidified lymph from injuries, surgeries, and chronic movement patterns) out of the muscle and soft tissue — “milking the tissue”